Fine Pitch Effect and Pitch Setting

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chrisr
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Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:18 am

Fine Pitch Effect and Pitch Setting

Postby chrisr » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:35 am

Hello, I'm pretty new to Famitracker, and I have stumbled upon a problem that I don't know what's the solution to. Basically, I'm trying to recreate an instrument from a song, and it uses the Fine Pitch Effect. I don't want to deal with having to put in those values over and over again, so I turned to the pitch setting in the Instrument Editor. This is where my problem is. How can I reflect the Fine Pitch effect values on the pattern editor onto the Instrument Editor so I can therefore recreate the instrument? Is there some sort of math involved that can turn that value into something I can put in the instrument editor?
The attached image shows the values I want to copy into the instrument. Thanks in advance!
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Shywolf
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Re: Fine Pitch Effect and Pitch Setting

Postby Shywolf » Thu Nov 30, 2017 10:27 pm

The Pxx values are in hexadecimal. x80 is "normal" and corresponds to 0. x81 corresponds to +1. x7E and x7C correspond to -2 and -4. And so on.

Note that values in the Instrument Editor's Pitch Sequence editor are relative. Input +1, and the pitch is now +1 relative to the note played. Input a 0 after, and the pitch is still +1 relative to the note played. Input a -2 after the 0, and the pitch is now -1 relative to the note played. You can see how it might get confusing.

Also, the sequence shown in that screenshot looks like vibrato. It might be better to just use the 4xx effect instead of going to pains to copy that down exactly.

chrisr
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Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:18 am

Re: Fine Pitch Effect and Pitch Setting

Postby chrisr » Fri Dec 01, 2017 1:31 am

Shywolf wrote:The Pxx values are in hexadecimal. x80 is "normal" and corresponds to 0. x81 corresponds to +1. x7E and x7C correspond to -2 and -4. And so on.

Note that values in the Instrument Editor's Pitch Sequence editor are relative. Input +1, and the pitch is now +1 relative to the note played. Input a 0 after, and the pitch is still +1 relative to the note played. Input a -2 after the 0, and the pitch is now -1 relative to the note played. You can see how it might get confusing.

Also, the sequence shown in that screenshot looks like vibrato. It might be better to just use the 4xx effect instead of going to pains to copy that down exactly.

Ah, I didn't quite understand since it was hexadecimal. I thought I would have to put in the literal hexadecimal values into the instrument editor (because 80 in hexadecimal is 128 in decimal), not thinking that 80 would just mean 0. Thank you for clearing it up!

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PinoBatch
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Re: Fine Pitch Effect and Pitch Setting

Postby PinoBatch » Sat Dec 02, 2017 3:20 am

This is called offset binary or excess 128, where P01 means 1 - 128 = -127, P70 means 112 - 128 = -16, P90 means 136 - 128 = 16, and PFF means 255 - 128 = 127. This encoding is also used in 8-bit .wav files (but not in 16-bit or deeper).
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